2017 Solar Eclipse

August 21st 2017 is a date that will not soon leave my memory. A close friend, his son and I made the long voyage to Northern Oregon to catch the Total Solar Eclipse.

The "Diamond Ring Effect" caused by the last edge of the sun disappearing behind the moon

We began our journey in Santa Rosa, California from where it would take us two days driving to reach the path of totality that stretched across Oregon from West to East. Our plan had us camping our first night at a beautiful Alpine Lake near Mount Shasta. Unfortunately we encountered some car troubles on the way up which forced us to take a 2 hour detour, and were forced to hike to Porcupine Lake in the dark. The darkness however, did not disappoint, and we were offered some spectacular views of the Milky Way over the lake.

23 minute exposure over Porcupine Lake

23 minute exposure over Porcupine Lake

A different backdrop than we were used to.

A different backdrop than we were used to.

The next morning I awoke to photograph sunrise. I was extremely tired from the long day before, but the photo was well worth the trouble.

Porcupine Sunrise

Porcupine Sunrise

After breakfast we hiked back to the car to finish the drive to Northern Oregon. This ended up taking longer than we anticipated and we had to pull off the side of the road and camp somewhere near Detroit, Oregon.

Finally we arrived at the Pacific Crest Trailhead at Olallie Lake, Oregon where we would begin the journey on foot. Thankfully it was only 3-4 miles, because our packs were extremely heavy with food, clothes, camping and photo equipment. 

Our camping spot was absolutely world class, and we had the next 3 days to lounge and explore, before the real crowds began to show up.

Cigar Lake, Oregon

Cigar Lake, Oregon

The next days were spent meandering the nearby trails to other lakes, and eating the endless supplies of huckleberries the forest provided. 

Camping Life

Camping Life

As the eclipse drew nearer, we made sure we had charged batteries, and began planning how we would shoot something that we had no experience of. From a photographic standpoint, photographing your first eclipse is extremely challenging, due to the constantly changing light levels.

Watching the sun slowly retreat behind the moon through a piece of solar film, I began to prepare my cameras. Below is what I managed to capture 

Wide angle view of the eclipse. During totality the horizon appears as a sunset in 360 degrees.

Wide angle view of the eclipse. During totality the horizon appears as a sunset in 360 degrees.

The "Diamond Ring Effect" captured in a video, which is linked below

The "Diamond Ring Effect" captured in a video, which is linked below

My good friend Chad Zalunardo, an amazing photographer was able to capture some astounding images with his small Orion telescope. You can find more of Chad's images HERE

The progression of the eclipse as seen through Chad's scope.

The progression of the eclipse as seen through Chad's scope.

It is safe to say I am now a life long eclipse-chaser. This was such an awe-inspiring experience, and it can never be described with images, let alone words. I hope if you are reading this, you will one day be able to experience the magic of a total solar eclipse!